Top banner
Why the government is attacking e-cigarette ads

Why the government is attacking e-cigarette ads

Although there are few posters or advertising spots in France extolling the merits of electronic cigarettes, the government wants to regulate what it considers to be a problem in the making.

Is the ban on electronic cigarette advertising the end of its heyday? During the presentation of her anti-smoking plan, Marisol Touraine announced that advertisements for e-cigarettes will be limited initially before being definitively banned from public places on May 20, 2016. The federation of cigarette professionals electronic (Fivape) stepped up to the plate, believing that the government was amalgamating between traditional cigarettes and electronic cigarettes. “It's an absurd decision, we don't understand. The electronic cigarette is put on the same level as the cigarette, reacted Arnaud Dumas de Rauly, president of Fivape. The electronic cigarette must be subject to specific regulations. It is neither a tobacco product nor a medicine. ”

Indeed, advertising for classic cigarettes was and remains governed by the Evin law of 1991 which prohibits "any propaganda or advertising, direct or indirect, in favor of tobacco or tobacco products". The new provisions applying to advertisements for e-cigarettes, which are in fact only the transposition into French law of a European directive already passed, are thus similar to those of the Évin Law. Until now, e-cigarette advertisements were tolerated, as long as she did not draw the parallel between e-cigarette and tobacco. Texts and visuals should therefore refrain from adopting the codes of traditional cigarettes, whether in terms of gestures or vocabulary ("smoking", "ashtray" ...).

Young people, the preferred target of manufacturers

In the government's sights, the attraction of young people for e-cigarettes, presented as less harmful. "For a young person who has never smoked, the electronic cigarette can become a gateway to smoking." A report from the French Office for the Prevention of Smoking (OFT) sounded the alarm last year concerning advertisements for e-cigarettes "often aggressive or ultra-attractive". He indicated that manufacturers targeted two audiences more specifically: women and… young people. "Although e-cigarette manufacturers deny that they want to conquer this market, it is likely that it will become one of the first marketing objectives in the years to come," the report read. The television advertisement for Clopinette electronic cigarettes, which aired last January, thus presents a colorful and festive universe, popular with teenagers. In addition, the vocabulary used (“vapoter, verb from the first group”) is reminiscent of school and thus targets young people in particular.

Although there are no official figures regarding the e-cigarette advertising market, few advertisements have so far been visible on French screens or billboards. However, some brands, which took hold of this communication niche early on, did not hesitate to deploy all the traditional advertising codes to “glamorize” their products. The company J Well, the leading French seller of electronic cigarettes, has thus produced several promotional spots showing women with advantageous plastic vaping lasciviously and outright presenting their e-cigarettes as assets of seduction! In England, a spot from the VIP brand which multiplied suggestive innuendos was even censored, deemed too vulgar.

On the manufacturer side, no more worry than that. On the contrary. "We are in favor of the framework [of advertising for e-cigarettes]," said Karin Warin, co-founder of Clopinette. Word of mouth has been the best advertisement for us from the start and our 400.000 customers have understood the benefits of our products. ” While brands have little recourse to poster or television advertising campaigns, they can count on the visibility of e-cigarette retailers, which are increasingly numerous in France. In four years, their number has multiplied by more than 200.

The manufacturers thus redouble their ingenuity to promote themselves. British brand E-Lites has found a way to target a young audience without resorting to billboards or TV spots. She managed to convince singer Lily Allen to highlight her flagship product in one of her music videos, Hard Out Here. In the middle of the song, the dancers ostensibly take out their branded e-cigarette case before vaping, lighting up the brand's characteristic green light. The clip has been viewed over 31 million times on YouTube, arguably the best commercial ever for E-Lites.

 

source: Le Figaro by Géraldine Russel

Com Inside Bottom
Com Inside Bottom
Com Inside Bottom
Com Inside Bottom

About the Author

Editor-in-chief of Vapoteurs.net, the reference site for vaping news. Engaged in the world of vaping since 2014, I work every day to ensure that all vapers and smokers are informed.